Every child has to be given a chance to prove what they can do. Some people are going to be successful, others not. It has nothing to do with blindness.

Ms. Lydia Mansour

Aya, who joined the Center in 2000, reads from a Braille text.

The Peace Center for the Blind works hard to ensure that the blind and visually impaired students it serves receive the best education possible. The Center works with students individually, seeking to harness their unique potential and help them become fully integrated members of their communities. “Every child has to be given a chance to prove what they can do,” Ms. Lydia says. “Some people are going to be successful, others not. It has nothing to do with blindness.”

Each school year, twelve to thirteen students, typically ranging in age from eight to twenty-six, are enrolled in the academic program. Students receive instruction from both blind and sighted licensed teachers. The curriculum, taught through Braille textbooks, includes courses in Arabic, English, Science, Math, History, Religion, Geography, and others.

Students at the Peace Center study Braille textbooks.
Though the Center is registered with both the Israeli and Palestinian Ministries of Education, it follows the Palestinian curriculum standards. The goal is to prepare students to take and pass the Palestinian “Tawjihi” exam, the
yearly national exam that all students must pass in their 12th year in order to graduate from secondary school.
Access to education can be limited for a blind woman in a society that often perceives blindness as a debilitating and shameful disability. The Peace Center seeks to address this unfortunate reality, and educate women who are among the most remote and marginalized. Upon arriving at the Center, the student is assessed and placed in the appropriate grade, regardless of age. Students work both in class groups and in one-one one teaching sessions, with the goal of eventually reaching appropriate grade levels. The Peace Center’s educational approach is holistic in nature, addressing not only the academic struggles, but also social and psychological issues.
Reading Braille